music omh

Best Of Review Round-Up #1

The first round-up of the press reviews for the Best Of album.

Thanks to Paul Bingley For the Q review scan:

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there is a little sweetner in the form of Andalucia, the token new track that all Best Ofs seem to be legally obliged to carry. The track itself is fine; maybe not classic Doves, but it fits the retrospective mood by ticking all the boxes. Those wanting to shell out more will be pleased to receive a second disc of rarities and a DVD to boot.

The Places Between is that rare beast of a welcome retrospective. These are great tracks that have already done a good job of standing the test of time in a sometimes fickle genre. In a decade’s time they will still have their potency – something which guarantees continued play for this collection.

To read the full review, click here.

A greatest hits album is often cause for complaint, but the Doves have such a hit-packed back catalogue listening to this should be a pleasure. Hits including There Goes The Fear and Black and White Town to Words and Kingdom ofRust are mixed with hidden gems which never quite reaped the commercial success they deserved. MM

Electric Proms: Meat and Potatoes Review

The reviews keep coming, I think Music OMH enjoyed it..

****

Doves’ gig at the Roundhouse, part of the BBC’s short-lived, but increasingly influential Electric Proms series, was backed by the 20-strong London Bulgarian Choir. Their dramatic and sometimes otherworldly Gregorian chants lifted much of the Mancunians’ sometimes plodding output, although even their presence couldn’t save a few of the newer tracks from dragging.

Perhaps it says something about the band that their older songs – in particular the epic Cedar Room or the rarely-performed Catch The Sun (played only, according to Jimi Godwin, because the choir “forced us to”) are the ones that lend themselves best to off-kilter operatics. While newer tracks like Winter Hill, The Storm and Jetstream were fine enough, Doves didn’t try their hand at changing the songs to suit the choir, meaning that half the stage was too often taken up with a group of slightly awkward looking Bulgarians – a sad state of affairs for all concerned.

Goodwin’s men have developed – fairly or not – a reputation for delivering plodding meat and potatoes rock. While not in the Stereophonics mould yet, there are a couple of lulls (particularly The Greatest Denier and 10.03) that with a little more imagination both with their setlist and with the choir could have sent the concert stratospheric. The exclusion of The Last Broadcast’s gospel-tinged Satellites is a real misstep, and once the Bulgarian choir have demonstrated their awe-inspiringly powerful vocal range in a couple of solo folk songs (“This one is about falling for someone from another village” explains the choir leader, charmingly) the concert felt a little short on the soar.

To read the full article, click here.

.. and I think that’s enough for today. Plenty more reaction I’m sure over the weekend.

 

Doves Lost Souls Interview

Andy Williams Cedar EP Interview

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